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Political Science

New York Times Academic Pass

The New York Times Digital Access Pass provides digital only access seven days a week to New York Times content.  Each Academic Pass is good for a 24 hour period and provides access to the user on a laptop, desktop, tablet, or smartphone during that period.   After 24 hours, the user is logged off and will need to login again.

Initial User Registration:

To Register for your daily access to nytimes.com:

Visit:  (nytimes.com/passes)

·       Register for New York Times access

·       Select  “Create Account”.

·       Create a free NYTimes.com account using your school email address: shu.edu

·       Create a nytimes.com account password  

·       Check your email inbox , click  the link in your confirmation message to validate your email address.

·       Download your free NYT smartphone and tablet apps at nytimes.com/mobile.

·       Sign-up for “The Edit”, The New York Times student-focused newsletter. 

 

Once registered:

Users may access nytimes.com website and any NYT smartphone and tablet app from any location using the email they provided as their username. 

To Claim a Subsequent Pass After 24-hour Expiration:

Visit nytimes.com/passes to grab a new pass.  If you logged out of nytimes.com, login again using your school email address.

 

Getting Started

Political science and public affairs encompass a wide range of study.  As you begin your research, think about what topic(s) you are searching and which categories they correspond to: Criminal Justice, Culture and Society, Economic Issues, Education, Environment, Government Operations, Health, Social Welfare, World: Foreign Affairs and National Security.  Bookmark this guide - Political Science.  You may also want to review the United Nations and Public Administration Guides. Find the links to these Guides in the profile box on the left side of this page.
 
Use the catalog to help narrow down your search terms to a topic and a subtopic, such as france -- politics and government.  Are you looking for a particular time period or political figure?  Ask yourself questions.  It is just as important to figure out what information you do NOT need as well as the information you DO need.

Featured Resources

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Interlibrary Loan

If you need a resource that University Libraries does not subscribe to, we can help.  Articles are ordered through our ILLIAD system and are often available free of charge within 24 hours.  A pdf will be deposited in your library account. Go to ILLIAD to order an article.

Books are ordered through   EZ-Borrow.

Search Tips

Yes, you can google, but try these strategies to improve your search skills:
  • Use Advanced Search with AND, OR, NOT (Boolean searching)
  • “  “ (quotation marks) will narrow search to ONLY words contained within quotation marks         
  • For primary sources, intermingle search terms with letters, memoirs, oral history, diaries, finding aid
  • Use a variety of search terms appropriate for the time period you are researching
  • Different databases use varied terminology
  • Use left or right side limiters in databases to broaden or narrow search
  • Use bibliographies for citation chasing