Seton Hall University Libraries A-Z Databases

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New / Trial Databases

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The following databases are newly acquired or being evaluated for a future subscription.
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American Military Camp Newspapers, Part II provides additional military camp newspapers – 11 new titles – that unlock the immediate past so that researchers can examine America and its people during a tumultuous era in our nation’s history.
  • Open Access Resource
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Collection of digitized newspapers originally published by incarcerated persons in United States prisons, spanning the years between 1800 and 2020. This Open Access collection of newspapers produced by people who have been incarcerated will help readers learn about the prison experience through the voices of those who have lived it.
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Part I: Newspapers, 1729-1922; Part II: Books, 1701-1928
Anatomy of Protest in America delivers a unique opportunity to investigate through newspaper articles and editorials and books the people, places, events, organizations, and ideas, so important to Americans that they took action, exercised their rights, and stood up to protest.
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Ebony Magazine Archive covers civil rights, education, entrepreneurship and other social topics with an African-American focus. It includes more than 800 issues providing a broad view of African-American culture from its first issue in 1945 through 2014.
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While the world continues efforts to distance itself from the ravages of COVID 19, this experience is not as unique as we may have previously believed. Deadly epidemics have been challenging the populace since the earliest settlers came to American shores. You can research and read first-hand accounts of American infectious diseases using Accessible Archives’ latest collection: Quarantine and Infectious Disease Control in America Series.
PART I: Newspapers, 1736-1922
PART II: Books, 1823-1928
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Accessible Archives’ open access publication of The AMAROC News provides a unique opportunity to investigate post-World War I Americans in Germany and enhances the research experience for students and faculty studying the social and military history of America at the beginning of the Jazz Age.
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The Woman’s Tribune, with its motto in the masthead: “Equality Before The Law”, was launched by Clara Bewick Colby, from her home in Beatrice, Nebraska, in August 1883. For the next year, it was the official publication of the Nebraska Woman Suffrage Association. The Tribune and its publisher – also editor, typesetter, and correspondent — would become one of America’s most outspoken proponents of Women’s Suffrage and political rights.
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